Iaido

Iaido

Starting Iaido

Aikido de la Montagne, in addition to teaching aikido, follows the tradition of teaching iaido as an independent art. The dojo regularly offers introductory sessions in iaido to beginners from 15 years of age and up. These sessions start on a fixed date and last for 3 months. Please consult our schedule, and if necessary, contact us to find out whether it is possible to start at another time.

Under the direction of the chief instructor, Claude Berthiaume, the introductory sessions allow you to develop a solid base to progress in the art of drawing the sword, attacking an adversary, and sheathing the sword again. Beyond physical exercise, iaido demands intense mental concentration.

During the introductory period you have access to two classes per week. After a first trial class, it is necessary to only wear a white gi (judo or karate style) but if you continue a hakama (skirt-pants worn by the samourai class) will be necessary. As for the iaito (steel-bladed sword), we encourage you to get one relatively soon to deepen your practice. If you do not have an iaito, we can lend you a bokken (wooden sword) until you get one.

Schedule and Fees

Nov
24
Fri

5:30pm—6:30pm
Iaido [Berthiaume]

Nov 24 @ 17:30 – 18:30

5:30pm—6:30pm<br>Iaido [Berthiaume]

Claude Berthiaume began practicing aikido at the age of 17, under the direction of René Gauvin. When the latter retired in 1972, Claude joined the Montreal Aikikai, directed by Massimo Di Villadorata.

In 1974, he obtained his black belt and became the first Aikido instructor of the Service des sports at Université du Québec à Montréal, where he was finishing his Bachelor’s degree in Physical Education. At the same time, he began studying Iaido under Kanai Shihan.

In 1981, Berthiaume made a trip to Japan where he trained extensively.

In 1983 he became co-founder of the Centre Métropolitain d’Aikido and developed close ties with Yamada Shihan and more so Kanai Shihan, two students of Morehei Ueshiba, Founder of Aikido. Under their supervision, he traveled extensively in Canada, the United States, the Caribbean, South America and various European countries to attend over twenty seminars every year.

In 1988, Centre Métropolitain d’Aikido and Aikido Kensankai, an older Montréal dojo, merge to become Aikido de la Montagne. Berthiaume becomes the chief instructor a task that he has carried ever since. He teaches at the dojo 6 days per week.

Claude Berthiaume is one of the 7 technical directors of the East Coast United States Aikido Federation (USAF). He has been awarded a 7th degree black belt in 2004 and the title of Shihan (Master Instructor)

Nov
25
Sat

1:45pm—2:45pm
Iaido [Lefebvre / Bourguoin]

Nov 25 @ 13:45 – 14:45

1:45pm—2:45pm<br>Iaido [Lefebvre / Bourguoin]

Catherine Lefebvre started iaido in 2000 at the Aikikai of Universite Laval, Quebec, and then joined the Aikido de la Montagne in 2013.

She currently holds the rank of sandan in iaido.

She also practices aikido since 1999 and has the rank of nidan. She participates in numerous seminars of the East Coast United States Aikido Federation (USAF) and the Kiyoikaze Iaido Federation.

&

Liliane Bourgouin is a Physical education teacher and holder of a diploma from the National Circus School, Liliane began her practice of Aikido in 2002 and iaido in 2004.

She is currently ranked 2nd degree black belt (Nidan) in Aikido and a 3rd degree black belt (Sandan) in iaido.

Nov
27
Mon

5:30pm—6:30pm
Iaido [Berthiaume]

Nov 27 @ 17:30 – 18:30

5:30pm—6:30pm<br>Iaido [Berthiaume]

Claude Berthiaume began practicing aikido at the age of 17, under the direction of René Gauvin. When the latter retired in 1972, Claude joined the Montreal Aikikai, directed by Massimo Di Villadorata.

In 1974, he obtained his black belt and became the first Aikido instructor of the Service des sports at Université du Québec à Montréal, where he was finishing his Bachelor’s degree in Physical Education. At the same time, he began studying Iaido under Kanai Shihan.

In 1981, Berthiaume made a trip to Japan where he trained extensively.

In 1983 he became co-founder of the Centre Métropolitain d’Aikido and developed close ties with Yamada Shihan and more so Kanai Shihan, two students of Morehei Ueshiba, Founder of Aikido. Under their supervision, he traveled extensively in Canada, the United States, the Caribbean, South America and various European countries to attend over twenty seminars every year.

In 1988, Centre Métropolitain d’Aikido and Aikido Kensankai, an older Montréal dojo, merge to become Aikido de la Montagne. Berthiaume becomes the chief instructor a task that he has carried ever since. He teaches at the dojo 6 days per week.

Claude Berthiaume is one of the 7 technical directors of the East Coast United States Aikido Federation (USAF). He has been awarded a 7th degree black belt in 2004 and the title of Shihan (Master Instructor)

Nov
29
Wed

5:30pm—6:30pm
Iaido [Berthiaume]

Nov 29 @ 17:30 – 18:30

5:30pm—6:30pm<br>Iaido [Berthiaume]

Claude Berthiaume began practicing aikido at the age of 17, under the direction of René Gauvin. When the latter retired in 1972, Claude joined the Montreal Aikikai, directed by Massimo Di Villadorata.

In 1974, he obtained his black belt and became the first Aikido instructor of the Service des sports at Université du Québec à Montréal, where he was finishing his Bachelor’s degree in Physical Education. At the same time, he began studying Iaido under Kanai Shihan.

In 1981, Berthiaume made a trip to Japan where he trained extensively.

In 1983 he became co-founder of the Centre Métropolitain d’Aikido and developed close ties with Yamada Shihan and more so Kanai Shihan, two students of Morehei Ueshiba, Founder of Aikido. Under their supervision, he traveled extensively in Canada, the United States, the Caribbean, South America and various European countries to attend over twenty seminars every year.

In 1988, Centre Métropolitain d’Aikido and Aikido Kensankai, an older Montréal dojo, merge to become Aikido de la Montagne. Berthiaume becomes the chief instructor a task that he has carried ever since. He teaches at the dojo 6 days per week.

Claude Berthiaume is one of the 7 technical directors of the East Coast United States Aikido Federation (USAF). He has been awarded a 7th degree black belt in 2004 and the title of Shihan (Master Instructor)

HOW TO REGISTER

To register in the introductory program, please arrive on Tuesday or Thursday evening or Saturday morning, 30 minutes before one of the classes available to beginners. You may fill the release form at the dojo or download it here and bring it filled out. You must wear a gi (judo or karate style) except when you do the one free trial class. The dojo has gis for sale.

Click here for the registration form.

FEES AND SESSION DATES

IAIDO 3 mos 6 mos 1 yr
Regular $220 $390 $690
Introduction / Student $150

AIKIDO+IAIDO 3 mos 6 mos 1 yr
Regular $450 $780 $1370

For a complete list of fees and equipment, click here.

FREE TRIAL CLASS
To discover what iaido practice can bring you will take more than one class and we encourage you to judge for yourself, to watch a class, or even better to take a free trial class.

On the first Saturday of each semester the 1:45-2:45 p.m. class is available for a free trial. Please consult our schedule to find the start date for the next session.

Please arrive at the desk near the dojo entrance at around 13h15, and bring a white martial arts uniform (gi) or sports clothing with long sleeves and that covers your legs entirely. You must sign a release form. For the trial class we will lend you a bokken (wooden sword).

Bring a pair of slippers or zori. When you enter, you remove your shoes and use your zori to walk around in the dojo. Remove your zori (heels towards mat) when you enter the tatami (training mats). Please use no-one else’s zori but yours.

Being on time is important. Do not be late as it is not polite nor is it a good idea to miss the warm-ups at the start of class that prepare you for practice. Leave yourself around 20 minutes to familiarize yourself with the space, change into your gi and to be ready before class. Waiting for the start of class, take advantage of the time to relax and to make the physical and mental preparations you need.

Class Program

Each class starts (and ends) with a bow, signalling respect to previous instructors.

Classes start with a warm-up in which different ways of drawing, striking, and sheathing the sword are practiced.

Students then practice a series of katas (sequences of movements) individually under the supervision of the Sensei.

Forms taught

Aikido de la Montagne teaches the Muso Shinden Ryu style of iaido.

Shoden (Omori Ryu)

  1. Shohato – opponent in front
  2. Sato – opponent to the left
  3. Uto – opponent to the right
  4. Atarito – opponent behind
  5. Inyoshintai – in front and behind
  6. Ryuto – the blade leads
  7. Junto – follow the sword
  8. Gyakuto – reversal
  9. Seichuto – force the sword
  10. Koranto – tiger walk
  11. Kaete Inyoshintai – alternative version of #5
  12. Batto – pull the sword or rapid drawing

Chuden (Hasegawa Eishin ryu)

  1. Yokogumo – misty cloud
  2. Tora Issoku – tiger step
  3. Inazuma – lightning
  4. Ukigomo -floating cloud
  5. Yama Oroshi – the wind from the mountain
  6. Iwanami – waves on the rocks
  7. Uroko Gaeshi – return of the dragon
  8. Nami Gaeshi – the breaking wave
  9. Taki Otoshi – waterfall
  10. Nuki Uchi – draw and cut

Okuden (Kugesa)

  1. Kasumi – fog
  2. Sunegakoi – stop the mind
  3. Tosume – narrow door
  4. Towaki – along the door
  5. Shiho Giri – four direction cut
  6. Tanashita – under the shelf
  7. Ryozume – narrow border
  8. Torabashiri – the tiger’s run

Okuden (Tachi waza)

  1. Yukitsure – to go together
  2. Turedachi – take somewhere
  3. Somakuri (Gohogiri) – global attack or 5 different cuts
  4. Sodome (Hanashiushi) – block everything or explode
  5. Shinobu (Yorunotachi) – hide or night sword
  6. Yukichigai – passing through
  7. Sodesurikaeshi (Kennokoto) – rolled sleeves or be sly
  8. Moniri (Kakuretsu) – pass through the door
  9. Kabesoi (Hitinaka) – next to the wall or in the crowd
  10. Uke Nagashi (Yuriminuki) – stop and lead
  11. Ittomagoi – good-bye

In addition, complimentary styles are taught.

Eishin Ryu

Batto no Kata

  1. Junto
  2. Tsuigekito – the chase
  3. Shato – tilted
  4. Shihoto
  5. Zantotsuto

Oku no Kata

  1. Zenteki Gyakuto
  2. Tatekito – several enemies
  3. Koteki Gyakuto – opponent behind

Bangai no Kata

  1. Haya Nami
  2. Rai Den
  3. Jin Rai
  4. Shiho Giri

Hosoda Ryu

  1. Iwanami – waves on the rocks
  2. Ukifune Gaeshi – the return of the floating boat
  3. Noarashi Gaeshi – the wind in the country changed directions
  4. Utsusemi – emptiness
  5. Matsukaze – the wind in the pines
  6. Zangetsu Hidari – morning moon to the left
  7. Zangetsu Migi – morning moon to the right
  8. Do To Gaeshi – the large wave turns around
  9. Rai To Gaeshi – lightning turns around
  10. Yo To – force the blade or the living blade
  11. In To – passive blade
  12. Inazuma Gaeshi – lightning turns around

Keishi Ryu

  1. Maegoshi (Asayama Ichidan Ryu) – pass in front
  2. Musogaeshi (Shindo Munen Ryu) – the void turns around
  3. Migi No Teki (Kyoshin Miyashi Ryu) – opponent to the right
  4. Mawarigake (Tamiya Ryu) – rotating attack
  5. Shiho (Tatsume Ryu) – the four directions

Shindo Munen Ryu

  1. st series, 10 mouvements
  2. nd series, 20 mouvements

Seitei Iai ZNKR

  1. Mae – in front
  2. Ushiro – behind
  3. Ukenagashi – block and lead
  4. Tsuka Ate – hit with the handle
  5. Kesa Giri – directed cut
  6. Morote Tsuki – jab with two hands
  7. Sampogiri – three direction cut
  8. Ganmen Ate – strike to face
  9. Soete Tsuki – hand and blade together
  10. Shiho Giri – four direction cut
  11. So Giri
  12. Nuki Uchi

Seitei Iai Iaïdo

  1. Maegiri (Eishin Ryu)
  2. Zengogiri ou Mae Atogiri (Mugai Ryu)
  3. Kiriage (Shindo Munen Ryu)
  4. Shihogiri (Suio Ryu)
  5. Kissakigaishi (Hoki Ryu)

Toyama Ryu

  1. Mae No Teki – opponent in front
  2. Migi No Teki – opponent to right
  3. Hidari No Teki – opponent to left
  4. Ushiro No Teki – opponent behind
  5. Chokusen No Teki – opponent near in front
  6. Ushiro Mae No Teki – opponents in front and behind
  7. Migi, Hidari, Mae No Teki – opponents to the right, the left and in fronts
  8. Ittoryodan

Compter en japonais

  1. Ichi / Ipponme
  2. Ni / Nihonme
  3. San / Sanhonme
  4. Shi / Yohonme
  5. Go / Gohonme
  6. Roku / Ropponme
  7. Shichi / Shichihonme
  8. Hachi / Happonme
  9. Kyu / Kyuhonme
  10. Ju / Jupponme
  11. Juichi / Juiponme
  12. Juni / Junihonme
Testing Requirements
List of techniques

There are no “kyu” levels in iaido. The first exam is for shodan and it awards you a black belt. To take an exam you must have a minimum number of days of practice and have the approval of the chief instructor. There is an attendence sheet on a bulletin board in the dojo and you should mark and keep track of your hours.

Shodan (300 hours, minimum 2 years)

  • Shoden 12 forms

Nidan (350 hours, minimum 2 years after shodan)

  • Chuden 10 forms
  • Toyama Ryu 8 forms

Sandan (450 hours, minimum 3 years after nidan)

  • Okuden kugesa 8 forms
  • Before the test, the examiner will choose one of the following two combinations:
  • Shindo Munen Ryu 10 and Keishi Ryu 10+5 = 15 forms
  • Eishin Ryu and Seitei Iai Iaido 12 + 5 = 17 forms

Yondan (600 hours, minimum 4 years years after sandan)

  • Okuden tachi waza 11 forms
  • Before the test, the examiner will choose one of the following two combinations:
  • Hosoda Ryu and Seitei Iai ZNKR 24 forms
  • Shindo Munen Ryu 20 20 forms

Godan (750 hours, minimum 5 years years after yondan)

  • By recommendation

Rokudan (900 hours, minimum 6 years years after godan)

  • By recommendation
History of Iaido

Iaido is the art of drawing the sword and striking in a single movement. Originating in feudal Japan, it was systematized by Jinsuke Hayashizaki in 16th century. Iaido is practiced through katas (set sequences of movements).

The dojo honors the memory of Mitsunari Kanai Sensei, Shihan (grand master) of iaido. In addition to the strong ties that he had with Claude Berthiaume, his student for thirty years, Kanai Sensei came several times each year to teach iaido at the dojo. Today, Berthiaume Sensei is the technical director of the Kiyoikaze Iaido Federation and is known as the successor of Kanai Sensei and he is called upon to transmit Kanai Sensei’s teachings.

To find out more about iaido, its origins and its links with aikido, please visit the Kiyoikaze Iaido Federation website at www.kiyoikaze.org and look for the interview with Mitsunari Kanai.

Kanai Mitsunari Sensei

Iaido is the art of drawing the sword and striking in a single movement. Originating in feudal Japan, it was systematized by Jinsuke Hayashizaki in 16th century. Iaido is practiced through katas (set sequences of movements).

The dojo honors the memory of Mitsunari Kanai Sensei, Shihan (grand master) of iaido. In addition to the strong ties that he had with Claude Berthiaume, his student for thirty years, Kanai Sensei came several times each year to teach iaido at the dojo. Today, Berthiaume Sensei is the technical director of the Kiyoikaze Iaido Federation and is known as the successor of Kanai Sensei and he is called upon to transmit Kanai Sensei’s teachings.

To find out more about iaido, its origins and its links with aikido, please visit the Kiyoikaze Iaido Federation website at www.kiyoikaze.org and look for the interview with Mitsunari Kanai.

Kiyoikaze Federation

The japanese word “Kiyoikaze” means “pure wind”.

Its purpose is to develop and guide the instruction of Iaido as established by Mitsunari Kanai Sensei and carried on by Technical Director, Claude Berthiaume Shihan, Chief Instructor of Aikido de la Montagne, Montreal, Canada.

For additional information, please visit the Kiyoikaze Iaido Federation website. www.kiyoikaze.org